Category: cycling

Mike Hall inquest: two other drivers almost hit ultra-endurance cyclist, court hears

Hall was competing in 5,500km race in Australia when he died from massive head injuries after being hit by a car near Canberra

Two motorists almost hit an elite ultra-endurance cyclist on the morning he was killed near Canberra during an extreme race.

Respected British rider Mike Hall was competing in the 5,500km Indian Pacific Wheel Race on 31 March when he died from massive head injuries after being hit by a car.

Related: British ultra-endurance cyclist killed almost instantly, inquest told

Related: Australian cyclist deaths surge and road safety strategy ‘failing’

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British ultra-endurance cyclist Mike Hall in ‘Hunger Games on wheels’ when killed

Inquest hears Hall was wearing dark clothing and bike was ‘virtually indistinguishable’ in the dark

British ultra-endurance cyclist Mike Hall was in the midst of the “Hunger Games on wheels” when he died after being hit by a teenage driver near Canberra.

P-plater Shegu Bobb was 19 when his car hit Hall on 31 March last year on the Monaro Highway, south of the national capital, in darkness at 6.22am.

Related: Australian cyclist deaths surge and road safety strategy ‘failing’

Related: Mike Hall: British ultra-distance cyclist killed during race in Australia

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Peaks and troughs: cycling and eating in Austria’s Tyrol

Ahead of the Road World Championships, our writer samples the Alpine route, before riding off in search of the area’s best food producers

From the moment I step off the plane in Innsbruck, mountains dominate the view. Mighty and majestic, they instil a twinge of excitement (mixed with dread) when I imagine being up among them on two wheels.

It will certainly make for a magnificent backdrop next week, when more than 1,000 professional cyclists descend on Tyrol, western Austria, for the Road World Championships. After events in the US, Qatar and Norway in recent years, the annual UCI (Union Cycliste International) race is coming to the Herz der Alpen (heart of the Alps) – a slogan used on the postersall over the region.

Related: To ski or not to ski? Are the Alps fun without hurtling downhill?

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Mitchelton-Scott makes history with first Vuelta win for Australian team

Less than a decade after being formed, Mitchelton-Scott win one the most prestigious races on the global cycling calendar

In July 2010, businessman Gerry Ryan was at the Tour de France. Observing the national flags etched on team cars as they whizzed past, the multi-millionaire was troubled by the absence of an Australian standard. Ryan turned to friend and former national champion John Trevorrow: “Surely we should be able to put our own team together.”

Eight years later, the team conceived with that comment has made sporting history. On Sunday Mitchelton-Scott became the first Australian-registered team to win a Grand Tour, with Britain’s Simon Yates winning the Vuelta a España in Madrid. This achievement ranks alongside Cadel Evans’ 2011 Tour de France yellow jersey triumph as one of the most significant moments in Australian cycling.

Related: Mitchelton-Scott’s Matt White: ‘There’s unfinished business’ | Kieran Pender

In the last kilometres of Saturday’s stage 20, the team’s first victory at this rarefied level was ordained

Related: Landmark win for Australian women’s cycling team in Giro Rosa

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Simon Yates would not have won Vuelta with Team Sky, says Bradley Wiggins

• Former Team Skyrider speaks out against previous employers
• Wiggins: Yates deserves extra credit after Giro near miss

Sir Bradley Wiggins has claimed Simon Yates would have not have achieved his historic Vuelta success had he chosen to pursue his career with Team Sky. Wiggins believes Yates’s decision to steer clear of one of the sport’s most pre-eminent teams enabled him to storm to victory in Madrid on Sunday.

Related: Youth and potential puts Simon Yates at head of cycling’s next generation | William Fotheringham

Related: Simon Yates’s Vuelta a España win offers glimpse of world without Sky | William Fotheringham

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Why do crash helmets come in so many different shapes?

The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts

Why is it that falling off a horse, falling off a bicycle, falling off a motorcycle, falling out of an aeroplane and falling off a mountain each require a different hat?

Colwyn Lee, Swarkestone, Derbyshire

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Youth and potential puts Simon Yates at head of cycling’s next generation | William Fotheringham

The Vuelta champion is the youngest recent grand tour winner and can benefit from his team’s new focus on the discipline

Seven years ago, when Simon Yates took his first stage win at the Tour de l’Avenir, Great Britain had yet to win one of cycling’s major tours, although Bradley Wiggins and Chris Froome were about to come agonisingly close at the Vuelta a España. Eight grand tour wins later, out of a possible 18, with four different riders, British domination of this side of cycling now seems a given, in the same way that Quickstep Floors are expected to rule the roost in one‑day Classics.

In winning the Vuelta by 1min 46sec from the surprise runner-up Enric Mas, Yates has finally confirmed the potential he showed back in 2011. It was a timely leap, as the next generation is waiting in the wings: the American Sepp Kuss, so strong in the first two weeks of his first grand tour, Spain’s Mas, the Colombians Miguel Ángel López and Egan Bernal.

Related: Simon Yates’s Vuelta a España win offers glimpse of world without Sky | William Fotheringham

Related: Simon Yates’s Vuelta victory crowns a stunning year for British cycling

Born 7 August 1992 in Bury, Greater Manchester.

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Simon Yates’s Vuelta victory crowns a stunning year for British cycling

UK fans at the finish in Madrid were well aware they had just watched history being made

Under a hot September sky and to the incongruous strains of Bad Moon Rising – not to mention those of the even less podium-friendly Another One Bites the Dust – Simon Yates completed the final few laps of his first Grand Tour victory in Madrid on Sunday night.

At 7.48pm local time, after 23 days, 21 stages and 3,254.7km, the 26-year-old rider from Bury finally crossed the line outside the Cibeles palace.

Related: Simon Yates’ Vuelta glory built on endless patience and iron discipline

Related: Simon Yates thanks ‘secret weapon’ brother after retaining Vuelta lead

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Simon Yates turns attention to Giro d’Italia after his Vuelta triumph

• ‘I have unfinished business there’
• Yates pays tribute to Australian team

Simon Yates joined the exclusive club of Grand Tour champions on Sunday and then began plotting the next one. It is not likely to be the Tour de France, at least not yet. Instead, Yates revealed, it is the Giro d’Italia that will probably be his priority in 2019.

“My gut feeling is that I’d like to go back to the Giro because I have unfinished business there,” he said, the memory still raw of his collapse, 48 hours from the end of the race, in May. “I’ve not thought about it too much because I’ve been concentrating on this and the world championships [in Innsbruck in two weeks]. But my gut feeling is that’s where I’d like to try again.”

Related: Simon Yates’s Vuelta a España win offers glimpse of world without Sky | William Fotheringham

Related: Simon Yates’ Vuelta glory built on endless patience and iron discipline

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Simon Yates’s Vuelta a España win offers glimpse of world without Sky | William Fotheringham

The absence of heavyweight rider from the dominant team made for a fascinating race where strategy was the key factor

In the Bernard Hinault, Eddy Merckx and Miguel Indurain eras, a Giro, Vuelta or Tour de France which lacked the dominant force in professional cycling would have a completely different complexion. Something similar has happened in the six years since Team Sky began to acquire an iron grip on the grand tours, which is why Simon Yates’s victory in the Vuelta a España, like Tom Dumoulin’s in the 2017 Giro, offers a glimpse of what cycling might have become without Dave Brailsford’s drive for world domination.

Like Dumoulin in Italy Yates triumphed in an open race with a kaleidoscopic pattern of ever-changing complexity; the final stage of 101km on Sunday in Madrid, won by Elia Viviani in a bunch sprint, was that rare event in the last three weeks: a predictable day in Spain. The lack of pattern was seen in frequent victories for long-range breakaways, giving teams such as EF Education, Dimension Data, and Cofidis a taste of success that has come rarely this year. There was even, on Thursday at Lleida, a cliff-hanging finish in a flat stage.

Related: Simon Yates turns attention to Giro d’Italia after his Vuelta triumph

Related: Simon Yates’ Vuelta glory built on endless patience and iron discipline

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