Category: Paris-Roubaix

Andrea Tafi, 52, says he has a team for Roubaix comeback


Andrea Tafi continues on his unlikely comeback to race Paris-Roubaix on the 20th anniversary of his victory. Tafi, 52, tells the Belgian press that he already has found a team that has agreed to take him on in his quest for a return to the Hell of the North.

“I already have a team, but I cannot tell you which,” Tafi told Het Laatste Nieuws.

Tafi, who won Roubaix, Tour of Flanders, and Giro di Lombardía during his heyday two decades ago, shocked the cycling world when he told La Gazzetta dello Sport last month he intended to return to the WorldTour with the goal of racing Roubaix. Tafi said he continues to train like a pro and produces solid numbers during gran fondos and other long-distance rides.

Tafi said he believes Roubaix is the kind of race where experience and technique would allow him to stay even with riders half his age.

Nicknamed the “Gladiator,” Tafi was part of the Mapei super-team in the late 1990s and was among the top stars of the Italian generation that dominated the northern classics in the 1990s. Tafi was also among 18 riders who tested positive for EPO during the 1998 Tour de France in retroactive controls carried out in 2004.

Tafi said he rides up to 18,000 kilometers per year and still fits into his racing jersey he wore 20 years ago.

“I don’t want this to be a circus,” he La Gazzetta. “If I would do this, I would dedicate myself 110 percent. The idea is to race Roubaix. I would do everything to the minute detail. I don’t want to look ridiculous in front of the whole world. Patience, calm, serene — but let me dream. Let me taste this impossible mission.”

It remains to be seen which team might actually pick him up. It’s highly unlikely a WorldTour team with serious classics ambitions would offer up a temporary deal. Quick-Step Floors manager Patrick Lefevere, who was Tafi’s boss during the Mapei era, told Cyclingnews that he rejected an entreaty from Tafi for 2019. Tafi’s experience might come in handy to a younger rider, but there are plenty of contemporary veterans still active who could bring race savvy to the table.

It’s possible a second-tier team might take up Tafi, but that would mean his fate would depend on that team receiving a wild-card invitation. It remains to be seen if ASO would seriously consider what many might view as little more than a publicity stunt.

Read the full article at Andrea Tafi, 52, says he has a team for Roubaix comeback on VeloNews.com.

Andrea Tafi mulls Roubaix return at 52

No, it’s not a typo. Andrea Tafi, a winner of three of cycling’s five monuments, says he’s thinking about returning to racing 20 years after he won Paris-Roubaix. He would be 52.

The Italian, who raced from 1988 to 2005, told La Gazzetta dello Sport he’s considering a comeback in order to race the Hell of the North on the 20th anniversary of his 1999 victory.

“This crazy idea came to me; to come back and race Paris-Roubaix again,” Tafi told the Italian sports daily. “Twenty years after winning it. An impossible dream? Maybe, but I want to try.”

Tafi raced Roubaix 13 times, winning once and notching two other podiums. After retiring in 2005, Tafi opened a cycling tour lodge in his native Tuscany.

With his age well into the master’s category, Tafi wants to defy convention and try to convince a cycling team to hire him on. Would a WorldTour team or one of the invited squads want to risk one of their precious seven starting spots to a rider who hasn’t raced in nearly 15 years?

“I have to find someone to hire me,” Tafi said. “I cannot, then maybe we can ride the ‘gran fondo’ amateur event. I raced this summer in some events surrounded by young people and I was holding the pace. Someone said, ‘Why don’t you return to race Roubaix?’”

Tafi said he’s been in contact with second-tier teams but has not reached out to WorldTour-level teams. He also confirmed he’s been in contact with the UCI about reactivating his license and being available for anti-doping controls required six months before a return to competition.

Nicknamed the “Gladiator,” Tafi was part of the Mapei super-team in the late 1990s and was among the top stars of the Italian generation that dominated the northern classics in the 1990s. Tafi was also among 18 riders who tested positive for EPO during the 1998 Tour de France in retroactive controls carried out in 2004.

Tafi said he rides up to 18,000km per year and still fits into his racing jersey he wore 20 years ago.

“I don’t want this to be a circus,” he said. “If I would do this, I would dedicate myself 110 percent. The idea to race Roubaix. I would do everything to the minute detail. I don’t want to look ridiculous in front of the whole world. Patience, calm, serene — but let me dream. Let me taste this impossible mission.”

Read the full article at Andrea Tafi mulls Roubaix return at 52 on VeloNews.com.

Commentary: Pavé is the solution to a boring Tour

Every few years I add another video to my Bike Racing Video Hall of Fame, the collection of YouTube clips that I watch on repeat while procrastinating at work. These aren’t just any old bike race videos, but rather the Grade-A select stock of YouTube videos. Fabian vs. Tommeke on the Muur in 2010. Contador vs. Lance to Verbier in 2009. Chris Horner on l’Angliru in 2013.

My friends, I believe Sunday’s ninth stage of the Tour de France will be a first-ballot inductee to my YouTube hall of fame. Years from now, I will still watch the video with intrigue as the heroes of the 2018 Tour bounced their way across the cobblestone roads to Roubaix.

The 15 sectors of pavé created chaos within the peloton — every sector saw crashes, punctures, and a reshuffling of the group. Nearly every major GC contender was forced to battle back from a crash, mechanical calamity, or biological explosion. And somehow, those efforts paid off — the overall remained relatively unchanged, due to the Titanic struggle of a few teams to fight back.

Romain Bardet suffered a litany of mechanicals, chased all afternoon, and lost just seven seconds, calling his comeback a “miracle.” Chris Froome tangled with teammate Gianni Moscon and tumbled into a ditch, just inches away from yellow jersey holder Greg Van Avermaet. EF Education First-Drapac mount a heroic, all-hands-on-deck chase back to the group after its GC man, Rigoberto Uran, tumbled at perhaps the worst possible moment.

We were gifted amazing photos and video clips of the carnage. Olivier Naesen bunny-hopping his bicycle over Rafal Majka. Chris Froome doing the “Superman” leap off of his bike. Let’s all rejoice that both men were able to continue with the race without suffering major injuries.

Long story short: Sunday’s stage jolted us awake after several days of snore-worthy sprint stages.

We’ve seen the Tour rumble over cobblestones plenty of times, however Sunday’s stage established a new level of mayhem. At no point during the stage did the outcome feel predetermined or inevitable. It was wild.

The inclusion of such a stage raises several important question: Should legit Roubaix-grade cobblestones become standard issue in the Tour de France? Should the race make it a point to include a punishing, chaotic stage like this every year to upend the general classification? Are the crashes and mechanicals simply too extreme for a race that should be decided in the mountains?

Look, I am completely sympathetic to the plight of the pro riders, and the last thing I want is for injuries to determine the outcome. The race will undoubtedly miss Richie Porte, who crashed out on a seemingly innocuous stretch of asphalt and broke his collarbone. And I wonder if the Tour dodged a bullet on Sunday — there were broken bones, bruises, and bumps, but no life-threatening injuries.

Still, I must admit that Sunday’s stage created compelling drama — the type that glues viewers to their seats for an entire five-hour stage, and yes, gets them to re-watch the stage for the 1,000th time during a boring conference call. Could Bardet battle back? Would Nibali attack? What was Jakob Fuglsang doing?

That level of drama and unpredictability is what Tour organizer ASO is looking for, right? In recent years, the race has given us shortened 100km stages, and bizarre, perhaps gimmicky courses that are designed to inject action into the race. It’s no secret that ASO has embarked on a quest to upend the boring, controlled racing style that fans often blame on Team Sky and its army of talented domestiques. The Tour has become a battle for seconds; gaps are earned in time trials, and only on the hardest summit finishes. Swashbuckling attacks are no match for a $30 million team of all-star support riders, who can simply snuff out the aggression.

As we saw on Sunday, Sky’s army of domestiques could not tame the stones. Sky tried, and kudos to the team for riding at the front for much of the race. Even the richest team in the bunch was no match for the stones. Egan Bernal, Michal Kwiatkowski, Moscon, and even Froome all kissed the ground at some point in the race, and Sky spent much of the final 30km fighting to keep its riders in position.

That’s why, as a viewer, I welcome more cobblestones stages — why not have two during the race? Does each journey over the pavé need to contain the bite of Sunday’s course? For the sake of the riders, no. Perhaps ASO’s course designers can strike the right balance between carnage and drama.

The Tour will continue to seek out new formats and courses to inject drama into the race. We’re all waiting to see how next week’s 65km stage 17 to Bagnères-de-Luchon plays out. But perhaps the Tour organizers needn’t rack their brains to determine the proper parcours for drama. The simply need to look north, to the cobblestone roads to Roubaix.

Read the full article at Commentary: Pavé is the solution to a boring Tour on VeloNews.com.

A look back at the classics showdown between Sagan and Quick-Step

The 2018 northern classics will be remembered for the epic battle between Peter Sagan and Quick-Step.

Read the full article at A look back at the classics showdown between Sagan and Quick-Step on VeloNews.com.

Tech FAQ: Lennard’s perspective on Roubaix heart failure

Lennard Zinn answers questions about Michael Goolaerts’s fatal heart failure at Paris-Roubaix.

Read the full article at Tech FAQ: Lennard’s perspective on Roubaix heart failure on VeloNews.com.

Sagan’s spring was built around Paris-Roubaix

Bora-Hansgrohe sport director Patxi Vila told VeloNews the entire team was ready for the race, with the goal of delivering Sagan a win.

Read the full article at Sagan’s spring was built around Paris-Roubaix on VeloNews.com.

VN Show: How Peter Sagan outsmarted Quick-Step at Paris-Roubaix

Editor’s note: This VeloNews Show includes images from Tim de Waele/Getty Images, YouTube/Le Tour de France, YouTube/Cyclo-ing,

Read the full article at VN Show: How Peter Sagan outsmarted Quick-Step at Paris-Roubaix on VeloNews.com.

News Roundup: Roubaix rider locked out; Movistar on cobbles; Neben to Pan-Ams

Siskevicius comes in late to Roubaix and finds velodrome locked up; Movistar previews TDF cobblestones, and more.

Read the full article at News Roundup: Roubaix rider locked out; Movistar on cobbles; Neben to Pan-Ams on VeloNews.com.

Sagan steps closer to all-time greats with Roubaix win

Peter Sagan still has a ways to go to match cycling’s legends, but his win in Paris-Roubaix is a big step forward.

Read the full article at Sagan steps closer to all-time greats with Roubaix win on VeloNews.com.

Autopsy confirms Goolaerts suffered heart attack before crash

Autopsy confirms Michael Goolaerts suffered a heart attack before crashing at Paris-Roubaix.

Read the full article at Autopsy confirms Goolaerts suffered heart attack before crash on VeloNews.com.