Category: Tour de France

Roglic puts Tour de France in his crosshairs

The Slovenian wasted no time after winning the Spanish grand tour to say that the Tour is at the center of his ambitions.

Read the full article at Roglic puts Tour de France in his crosshairs on VeloNews.com.

Chris Froome hopes for a speedy return to racing

Chris Froome hopes to race again in 2019 and will participate in the Saitama Criterium in October.

Read the full article at Chris Froome hopes for a speedy return to racing on VeloNews.com.

Why Sam Bennett feels ‘disposable’ in today’s WorldTour sprint game

With 11 stage wins in 2019, the Irish sprinter is among the fastest men in the peloton. But he still feels like the third-string sprinter on his own team.

Read the full article at Why Sam Bennett feels ‘disposable’ in today’s WorldTour sprint game on VeloNews.com.

Felice Gimondi obituary

One of the greats of Italian cycling who won the 1965 Tour de France when he was only 22

Felice Gimondi, who has died of a heart attack aged 76, was one of Italy’s greatest cycling champions of the postwar era, a precociously young winner of the Tour de France who was widely viewed as the successor to the legendary “Campionissimo” Fausto Coppi. However, along with every professional cyclist racing between 1966 and 1976, Gimondi was unfortunate to be competing when Eddy Merckx was in his prime; in spite of that he built a palmarès (prize list) that places him in the top 10 cyclists of all time.

In 1964 Gimondi rode the Tokyo Olympic Games – as did Merckx – and went on to win that year’s Tour de l’Avenir, a mini version of the Tour de France for riders under 25 – currently it is for people under 23. The following year he became the only rider to win the Avenir and the Tour itself in successive seasons, when he took the Tour at the age of 22; until Egan Bernal’s victory this year, Gimondi remained the youngest Tour winner in the postwar era.

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Peugeot 3008: ‘Perfect for the Pyrenees – or the school run’

Peugeot’s comfortable new SUV offers cycling correspondent Jeremy Whittle a front row seat to all the action at this year’s Tour de France

Peugeot 3008
Price
£25,395
0-62mph 10.8 seconds
Top speed 117mph
MPG 68.9
CO2 from 109g/km
Eco score ★★★★☆

Few riders have dominated the world of cycling like Eddy Merckx. Known to all who feared him as the “Cannibal” because of his voracious appetite for devouring opponents, he is also often cited as the world’s most famous Belgian – that’s if you don’t count Jacques Brel, Eden Hazard or Jean-Claude Van Damme. In all he won five Tours de France, the first coming exactly 50 years ago, just as Neil Armstrong took that first small step on the moon. In honour of Merckx, and maybe all stellar performers, this year’s Tour started in Brussels, not far from his place of birth.

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Commentary: Geraint Thomas should race the Vuelta a España

There are a lot of reasons why Geraint Thomas should race the Vuelta — the Spanish grand tour is there for the taking

Read the full article at Commentary: Geraint Thomas should race the Vuelta a España on VeloNews.com.

Quintana hoping for ‘100 percent’ support in new team

The Colombia superstar suggests his impending team change will bring him more support than he received at Movistar

Read the full article at Quintana hoping for ‘100 percent’ support in new team on VeloNews.com.

Commentary: Here’s hoping Alaphilippe doesn’t change a thing

Julian Alaphilippe revived the dreams of France with his thrilling Tour ride, but this writer hopes “Loulou” stays just the way he is

Read the full article at Commentary: Here’s hoping Alaphilippe doesn’t change a thing on VeloNews.com.

Tour de France champion Bernal given hero’s welcome in Colombian home town

The 22-year-old phenom was welcomed by 10,000 fans in his home town of Zapaquira to celebrate his historic win.

Read the full article at Tour de France champion Bernal given hero’s welcome in Colombian home town on VeloNews.com.

Cycling’s latest tragedy will shake the faith of the keenest enthusiast | William Fotheringham

Bjorg Lambrecht’s death on Monday was the eighth of an international rider since 2016. Is the sport really worth it?

It is almost 25 years since I stood in the French town of Pau on a July afternoon in 1995 and watched the six members of the Motorola team, including a young Lance Armstrong, ride into the Tour de France stage finish a few hundred metres in front of the peloton. It remains the single most impressive and affecting memory I can summon up in over 30 years of following cycling.

The men of the Tour had taken eight hours to ride that day’s mountain stage over some of the race’s greatest ascents at the pace of a funeral cortege, in honour of the Italian Olympic champion Fabio Casartelli, who had died the previous afternoon after falling off at high speed on the descent of the Col du Portet d’Aspet; on Tuesday the field of the Tour de Pologne paid an identical tribute to the young Belgian Bjorg Lambrecht.

Related: Bjorg Lambrecht dies after crash during Tour of Poland cycling race

Related: Unpredictable elements crucial to rekindling of Tour de France romance | Richard Williams

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